SCUBA DIVING AROUND DUN LAOGHAIRE

Dalkey Island and the Muglins

At the southern end of Dublin Bay lie two islands about 1 km from the shore. These islands are probably two of the most dived on places in Ireland. The largest is Dalkey Island and the smaller is The Muglins. When conditions are good diving here can rival many of the best sites in the west of Ireland.

There is a wealth of marine life supported by it's nutrient rich waters. Anenomes, starfish, sponges, mussels and seaweeds adorn the rocks, while Pollack, Wrasse, conger, ling, etc. swim in the immediate vacinity. Crabs, lobsters and octopus hide in their rocky crevices.

Diving these islands is not as easy as it appears. Even on a calm day there is considerable turbulence from the strong currents that flow around them, but providing one knows these currents they are a pleasure to dive. A Surface Marker Buoy, Compass and a Torch are almost items of equipment for safe diving. Needless to say, it is an area for experienced divers only.

Dalkey Island
Apart from the South Eastern end of the Island the diving is shallow, 8-10m, with rocks covered with thick kelp on a sandy bottom. This is ideal for the novice diver.

Maiden Rock
Entry from the North tip of the rock shelters you from the strong currents that race past on either side. Proceeding due North for 30m, and down to a depth of 12m you may well see the remains of a wreck encrusted with orange coloured anenomes. However, because of it's deteriorated state this wreck is sometimes missed.

The Muglins
The island is oval in shape and about 100m long, 17m wide at it's Northern end tapering off Southwards. The rock is granite and has a cigar shaped, red and white navigation beacon on top. There is a small quay on the Western side facing Dalkey Island.

Dublin Bay Wrecks
There are many wrecks in the Dublin Bay area. Two of the more interesting are the R.M.S.. Leinster and the H.M.S. Guide Me II. The first is a passenger boat sunk in October 1918, one month before Armistice, the second a small gunboat sunk in August 1918. Other wrecks include the Bolivar, the Marlay and the Queen Victoria. Expeditions are arranged periodically by Oceantec, a dive centre.

For more information please visit the Dive Ireland web site.

Handy Links

  • Underwater Council of Ireland
  • PADI Web Site
  • Dive Ireland


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